Saturday, 4 February 2012

Mockingbird

11-year-old Caitlin has Asperger’s syndrome, and has always had her older brother, Devon, to explain the confusing things around her. But when Devon is killed in a tragic school shooting, Caitlin has to try and make sense of the world without him. With her dad spending most of his time crying in the shower, and her life at school becoming increasingly difficult, it doesn’t seem like things will ever get better again. 

A heart-warming story of loss and recovery that won the American National Book Award 2010 – one of the most moving books you’ll ever read






This novel is a heart-breaking moving masterpiece that deal with a girl who has Asperger's syndrome deal with the death of her beloved brother and her path to finding closure. Caitlin's struggle is that of anyone who's family member has been killed, yet she has more of a struggle as she does not understand the emotion involved to deal with this.

I found that the writing style and language while very child like was realistic, it stands in good favor for the author that she can voice a character so well. The character of Caitlin truly does grow on her path, she has to learn about empathy and closure, and making friends. Caitlin found out just how much she needed her brother she didn't have anyone to tell her how to do things the right way so the people at school wouldn't think she was weird. She found her own closure by finishing what her brother started, something he was going to be proud of.

The story at times was predicable though I don't think it ruined the way I read the book, I actually enjoyed reading it and to learn a little more about 'To Kill a Mockingbird' was fantastic, it a book that I have on my shelf waiting to be read.

This is a book that should be read be people of all ages, as it will help people understand just how hard it is for someone with a disability to understand things and show them how people find closure in different ways.

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